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Trisomy 8 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: A NOPHO-AML study.

La, 22/07/2017 - 22:33
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Trisomy 8 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: A NOPHO-AML study.

Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2016 Sep;55(9):719-26

Authors: Laursen AC, Sandahl JD, Kjeldsen E, Abrahamsson J, Asdahl P, Ha SY, Heldrup J, Jahnukainen K, Jónsson ÓG, Lausen B, Palle J, Zeller B, Forestier E, Hasle H

Abstract
Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML and to investigate its prognostic impact. Complete cytogenetic data were available in 596 patients (98%) aged 0-18 years, diagnosed from 1993 to 2012, and treated according to the NOPHO-AML 1993 and 2004 protocols in the Nordic countries and Hong Kong. We identified 86 patients (14%) with +8. Trisomy 8 was combined with other cytogenetic aberrations in 68 patients (11%) (+8 other) and in 18 patients (3%), it was the sole abnormality (+8 alone). Trisomy 8 was associated with FAB M5 (36%) but otherwise clinically comparable with non-trisomy 8 patients. Trisomy 8 was favorable in patients of young age and with t(9;11). Trisomy 8 alone was associated with older age (median age 10.1 years), FAB M2 (33%), and FLT3-ITD mutations (58%). The 5-year event-free survival for patients with +8 alone was 50% and 5-year overall survival was 75%. In conclusion, +8 is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in pediatric AML. Trisomy 8 positive AML is a heterogeneous group and the majority of cases have additional cytogenetic aberrations. Patients with +8 alone differed from patients with +8 other and were associated with older age, FAB M2, and FLT3-ITD aberrations. There were no differences in survival despite the more frequent occurrence of FLT3-ITD in +8 alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID: 27153159 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Plasma proteomics in CML patients before and after initiation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy reveals induced Th1 immunity and loss of angiogenic stimuli.

To, 20/07/2017 - 22:32
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Plasma proteomics in CML patients before and after initiation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy reveals induced Th1 immunity and loss of angiogenic stimuli.

Leuk Res. 2016 Nov;50:95-103

Authors: Söderlund S, Christiansson L, Persson I, Hjorth-Hansen H, Richter J, Simonsson B, Mustjoki S, Olsson-Strömberg U, Loskog A

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The simultaneous measurement of many proteins is now possible using multiplex assays. In this pilot study we investigated a total of 124 proteins in plasma from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with the purpose of identifying proteins that are differently expressed at diagnosis and after tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment initiation.
METHODS: Samples were taken from 14 CML patients at diagnosis and after three months of TKI treatment (imatinib or dasatinib). Samples were analyzed by Mesoscale Discovery, Myriad RBM MAP technology and Olink Proseek.
RESULTS: Multiple plasma proteins were differentially expressed before and after initiation of TKI therapy. Protein patterns demonstrated a possible shift towards Th1-immunity and reduced angiogenic stimuli. Further, some plasma proteins were identified that can be of potential interest to study further for biologic, prognostic or therapeutic significance such as E-selectin, uPAR, growth hormone and carbonic anhydrase IX.
CONCLUSIONS: Plasma proteomics seems feasible and useful in CML patients, both for studying patterns of protein expression and for identifying single proteins differentially expressed before and after treatment. Plasma proteomics may be useful to map disease activity and biological processes. Hence, plasma proteomics can be used to understand drug mechanisms and treatment responses in CML.

PMID: 27710869 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Systematic Evaluation of Pleiotropy Identifies 6 Further Loci Associated With Coronary Artery Disease.

Ti, 18/07/2017 - 22:28
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Systematic Evaluation of Pleiotropy Identifies 6 Further Loci Associated With Coronary Artery Disease.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Feb 21;69(7):823-836

Authors: Webb TR, Erdmann J, Stirrups KE, Stitziel NO, Masca NG, Jansen H, Kanoni S, Nelson CP, Ferrario PG, König IR, Eicher JD, Johnson AD, Hamby SE, Betsholtz C, Ruusalepp A, Franzén O, Schadt EE, Björkegren JL, Weeke PE, Auer PL, Schick UM, Lu Y, Zhang H, Dube MP, Goel A, Farrall M, Peloso GM, Won HH, Do R, van Iperen E, Kruppa J, Mahajan A, Scott RA, Willenborg C, Braund PS, van Capelleveen JC, Doney AS, Donnelly LA, Asselta R, Merlini PA, Duga S, Marziliano N, Denny JC, Shaffer C, El-Mokhtari NE, Franke A, Heilmann S, Hengstenberg C, Hoffmann P, Holmen OL, Hveem K, Jansson JH, Jöckel KH, Kessler T, Kriebel J, Laugwitz KL, Marouli E, Martinelli N, McCarthy MI, Van Zuydam NR, Meisinger C, Esko T, Mihailov E, Escher SA, Alver M, Moebus S, Morris AD, Virtamo J, Nikpay M, Olivieri O, Provost S, AlQarawi A, Robertson NR, Akinsansya KO, Reilly DF, Vogt TF, Yin W, Asselbergs FW, Kooperberg C, Jackson RD, Stahl E, Müller-Nurasyid M, Strauch K, Varga TV, Waldenberger M, Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, Zeng L, Chowdhury R, Salomaa V, Ford I, Jukema JW, Amouyel P, Kontto J, MORGAM Investigators, Nordestgaard BG, Ferrières J, Saleheen D, Sattar N, Surendran P, Wagner A, Young R, Howson JM, Butterworth AS, Danesh J, Ardissino D, Bottinger EP, Erbel R, Franks PW, Girelli D, Hall AS, Hovingh GK, Kastrati A, Lieb W, Meitinger T, Kraus WE, Shah SH, McPherson R, Orho-Melander M, Melander O, Metspalu A, Palmer CN, Peters A, Rader DJ, Reilly MP, Loos RJ, Reiner AP, Roden DM, Tardif JC, Thompson JR, Wareham NJ, Watkins H, Willer CJ, Samani NJ, Schunkert H, Deloukas P, Kathiresan S, Myocardial Infarction Genetics and CARDIoGRAM Exome Consortia Investigators

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have so far identified 56 loci associated with risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Many CAD loci show pleiotropy; that is, they are also associated with other diseases or traits.
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to systematically test if genetic variants identified for non-CAD diseases/traits also associate with CAD and to undertake a comprehensive analysis of the extent of pleiotropy of all CAD loci.
METHODS: In discovery analyses involving 42,335 CAD cases and 78,240 control subjects we tested the association of 29,383 common (minor allele frequency >5%) single nucleotide polymorphisms available on the exome array, which included a substantial proportion of known or suspected single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with common diseases or traits as of 2011. Suggestive association signals were replicated in an additional 30,533 cases and 42,530 control subjects. To evaluate pleiotropy, we tested CAD loci for association with cardiovascular risk factors (lipid traits, blood pressure phenotypes, body mass index, diabetes, and smoking behavior), as well as with other diseases/traits through interrogation of currently available genome-wide association study catalogs.
RESULTS: We identified 6 new loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance: on 2q37 (KCNJ13-GIGYF2), 6p21 (C2), 11p15 (MRVI1-CTR9), 12q13 (LRP1), 12q24 (SCARB1), and 16q13 (CETP). Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.15 to 0.86, and odds ratio per copy of the risk allele ranged from 1.04 to 1.09. Of 62 new and known CAD loci, 24 (38.7%) showed statistical association with a traditional cardiovascular risk factor, with some showing multiple associations, and 29 (47%) showed associations at p < 1 × 10(-4) with a range of other diseases/traits.
CONCLUSIONS: We identified 6 loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance. Several CAD loci show substantial pleiotropy, which may help us understand the mechanisms by which these loci affect CAD risk.

PMID: 28209224 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Impact of FAB classification on predicting outcome in acute myeloid leukemia, not otherwise specified, patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1: An analysis of 1690 patients from the acute leukemia working party of EBMT.

Ti, 18/07/2017 - 22:28
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Impact of FAB classification on predicting outcome in acute myeloid leukemia, not otherwise specified, patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1: An analysis of 1690 patients from the acute leukemia working party of EBMT.

Am J Hematol. 2017 Apr;92(4):344-350

Authors: Canaani J, Beohou E, Labopin M, Socié G, Huynh A, Volin L, Cornelissen J, Milpied N, Gedde-Dahl T, Deconinck E, Fegueux N, Blaise D, Mohty M, Nagler A

Abstract
The French, American, and British (FAB) classification system for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is extensively used and is incorporated into the AML, not otherwise specified (NOS) category in the 2016 WHO edition of myeloid neoplasm classification. While recent data proposes that FAB classification does not provide additional prognostic information for patients for whom NPM1 status is available, it is unknown whether FAB still retains a current prognostic role in predicting outcome of AML patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Using the European Society of Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation registry we analyzed outcome of 1690 patients transplanted in CR1 to determine if FAB classification provides additional prognostic value. Multivariate analysis revealed that M6/M7 patients had decreased leukemia free survival (hazard ratio (HR) of 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.99; P = .046) in addition to increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rates (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.06-3.01; P = .028) compared with other FAB types. In the NPM1(wt) AML, NOS cohort, FAB M6/M7 was also associated with increased NRM (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.14-4.16; P = .019). Finally, in FLT3-ITD(+) patients, multivariate analyses revealed that specific FAB types were tightly associated with adverse outcome. In conclusion, FAB classification may predict outcome following transplantation in AML, NOS patients.

PMID: 28052366 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

Ti, 18/07/2017 - 22:28
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Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

PLoS One. 2016;11(7):e0158801

Authors: Vigorito E, Kuchenbaecker KB, Beesley J, Adlard J, Agnarsson BA, Andrulis IL, Arun BK, Barjhoux L, Belotti M, Benitez J, Berger A, Bojesen A, Bonanni B, Brewer C, Caldes T, Caligo MA, Campbell I, Chan SB, Claes KB, Cohn DE, Cook J, Daly MB, Damiola F, Davidson R, Pauw Ad, Delnatte C, Diez O, Domchek SM, Dumont M, Durda K, Dworniczak B, Easton DF, Eccles D, Edwinsdotter Ardnor C, Eeles R, Ejlertsen B, Ellis S, Evans DG, Feliubadalo L, Fostira F, Foulkes WD, Friedman E, Frost D, Gaddam P, Ganz PA, Garber J, Garcia-Barberan V, Gauthier-Villars M, Gehrig A, Gerdes AM, Giraud S, Godwin AK, Goldgar DE, Hake CR, Hansen TV, Healey S, Hodgson S, Hogervorst FB, Houdayer C, Hulick PJ, Imyanitov EN, Isaacs C, Izatt L, Izquierdo A, Jacobs L, Jakubowska A, Janavicius R, Jaworska-Bieniek K, Jensen UB, John EM, Vijai J, Karlan BY, Kast K, Investigators K, Khan S, Kwong A, Laitman Y, Lester J, Lesueur F, Liljegren A, Lubinski J, Mai PL, Manoukian S, Mazoyer S, Meindl A, Mensenkamp AR, Montagna M, Nathanson KL, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Niederacher D, Olah E, Olopade OI, Ong KR, Osorio A, Park SK, Paulsson-Karlsson Y, Pedersen IS, Peissel B, Peterlongo P, Pfeiler G, Phelan CM, Piedmonte M, Poppe B, Pujana MA, Radice P, Rennert G, Rodriguez GC, Rookus MA, Ross EA, Schmutzler RK, Simard J, Singer CF, Slavin TP, Soucy P, Southey M, Steinemann D, Stoppa-Lyonnet D, Sukiennicki G, Sutter C, Szabo CI, Tea MK, Teixeira MR, Teo SH, Terry MB, Thomassen M, Tibiletti MG, Tihomirova L, Tognazzo S, van Rensburg EJ, Varesco L, Varon-Mateeva R, Vratimos A, Weitzel JN, McGuffog L, Kirk J, Toland AE, Hamann U, Lindor N, Ramus SJ, Greene MH, Couch FJ, Offit K, Pharoah PD, Chenevix-Trench G, Antoniou AC

Abstract
Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

PMID: 27463617 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Combined deletion and DNA methylation result in silencing of FAM107A gene in laryngeal tumors.

Su, 16/07/2017 - 22:27

Combined deletion and DNA methylation result in silencing of FAM107A gene in laryngeal tumors.

Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 14;7(1):5386

Authors: Kiwerska K, Szaumkessel M, Paczkowska J, Bodnar M, Byzia E, Kowal E, Kostrzewska-Poczekaj M, Janiszewska J, Bednarek K, Jarmuż-Szymczak M, Kalinowicz E, Wierzbicka M, Grenman R, Szyfter K, Marszałek A, Giefing M

Abstract
Larynx squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is characterized by complex genotypes, with numerous abnormalities in various genes. Despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment of this disease, 5-year survival rates remain unsatisfactory. Therefore, the extended studies are conducted, with the aim to find genes, potentially implicated in this cancer. In this study, we focus on the FAM107A (3p14.3) gene, since we found its significantly reduced expression in LSCC by microarray profiling (Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 array). By RT-PCR we have confirmed complete FAM107A downregulation in laryngeal cancer cell lines (15/15) and primary tumors (21/21) and this finding was further supported by FAM107A protein immunohistochemistry (15/15). We further demonstrate that a combined two hit mechanism including loss of 3p and hypermethylation of FAM107A promoter region (in 9/15 cell lines (p < 0.0001) and in 15/21 primary tumors (p < 0.0001)) prevails in the gene transcriptional loss. As a proof of principle, we show that Decitabine - a hypomethylating agent - restores FAM107A expression (5 to 6 fold increase) in the UT-SCC-29 cell line, characterized by high DNA methylation. Therefore, we report the recurrent inactivation of FAM107A in LSCC, what may suggest that the gene is a promising tumor suppressor candidate involved in LSCC development.

PMID: 28710449 [PubMed - in process]

Molecular definitions of autophagy and related processes.

La, 15/07/2017 - 22:26
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Molecular definitions of autophagy and related processes.

EMBO J. 2017 Jul 03;36(13):1811-1836

Authors: Galluzzi L, Baehrecke EH, Ballabio A, Boya P, Bravo-San Pedro JM, Cecconi F, Choi AM, Chu CT, Codogno P, Colombo MI, Cuervo AM, Debnath J, Deretic V, Dikic I, Eskelinen EL, Fimia GM, Fulda S, Gewirtz DA, Green DR, Hansen M, Harper JW, Jäättelä M, Johansen T, Juhasz G, Kimmelman AC, Kraft C, Ktistakis NT, Kumar S, Levine B, Lopez-Otin C, Madeo F, Martens S, Martinez J, Melendez A, Mizushima N, Münz C, Murphy LO, Penninger JM, Piacentini M, Reggiori F, Rubinsztein DC, Ryan KM, Santambrogio L, Scorrano L, Simon AK, Simon HU, Simonsen A, Tavernarakis N, Tooze SA, Yoshimori T, Yuan J, Yue Z, Zhong Q, Kroemer G

Abstract
Over the past two decades, the molecular machinery that underlies autophagic responses has been characterized with ever increasing precision in multiple model organisms. Moreover, it has become clear that autophagy and autophagy-related processes have profound implications for human pathophysiology. However, considerable confusion persists about the use of appropriate terms to indicate specific types of autophagy and some components of the autophagy machinery, which may have detrimental effects on the expansion of the field. Driven by the overt recognition of such a potential obstacle, a panel of leading experts in the field attempts here to define several autophagy-related terms based on specific biochemical features. The ultimate objective of this collaborative exchange is to formulate recommendations that facilitate the dissemination of knowledge within and outside the field of autophagy research.

PMID: 28596378 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Paroxysmal Dyskinesia in Border Terriers: Clinical, Epidemiological, and Genetic Investigations.

Pe, 14/07/2017 - 22:25

Paroxysmal Dyskinesia in Border Terriers: Clinical, Epidemiological, and Genetic Investigations.

J Vet Intern Med. 2017 Jul;31(4):1123-1131

Authors: Stassen QEM, Koskinen LLE, van Steenbeek FG, Seppälä EH, Jokinen TS, Prins PGM, Bok HGJ, Zandvliet MMJM, Vos-Loohuis M, Leegwater PAJ, Lohi H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the last decade, a disorder characterized by episodes of involuntary movements and dystonia has been recognized in Border Terriers.
OBJECTIVES: To define clinical features of paroxysmal dyskinesia (PD) in a large number of Border Terriers and to study the genetics of the disease.
ANIMALS: 110 affected and 128 unaffected client-owned Border Terriers.
METHODS: A questionnaire regarding clinical characteristics of PD was designed at Utrecht University and the University of Helsinki. Thirty-five affected Border Terriers underwent physical examination and blood testing (hematology and clinical biochemistry). Diagnostic imaging of the brain was performed in 17 affected dogs and electroencephalograms (EEG) between episodes were obtained in 10 affected dogs. A genomewide association study (GWAS) was performed with DNA of 110 affected and 128 unaffected dogs.
RESULTS: One hundred forty-seven questionnaires were included in the study. The most characteristic signs during episodes were dystonia, muscle fasciculations, and falling over. The majority of owners believed that their dogs remained conscious during the episodes. A beneficial effect of anti-epileptic therapy was observed in 29 of 43 dogs. Fifteen owners changed their dogs' diet to a hypoallergenic, gluten-free diet, and all reported reasonable to good improvement of signs. Clinical examinations and diagnostic test results were unremarkable. The GWAS did not identify significantly associated chromosome regions.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: The survey results and EEG studies provided further evidence that the observed syndrome is a PD rather than epilepsy. Failure to achieve conclusive results by GWAS indicates that inheritance of PD in Border Terriers probably is complex.

PMID: 28703446 [PubMed - in process]

The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017.

Pe, 14/07/2017 - 22:25
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The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017.

Leukemia. 2017 Jul 13;:

Authors: Meyer C, Burmeister T, Gröger D, Tsaur G, Fechina L, Renneville S, Sutton R, Venn NC, Emerenciano M, Pombo-de-Oliveira MS, Barbieri Blunck C, Almeida Lopes B, Zuna J, Trka J, Ballerini P, Lapillonne H, De Braekeleer M, Cazzaniga G, Corral Abascal L, van der Velden VHJ, Delabesse E, Park TS, Oh SH, Silva MLM, Lund-Aho T, Juvonen V, Moore AS, Heidenreich O, Vormoor J, Zerkalenkova E, Olshanskaya Y, Bueno C, Menendez P, Teigler-Schlegel S, Zur Stadt U, Lentes J, Göhring G, Kustanovich S, Aleinikova O, Schäfer BW, Kubetzko S, Madsen HO, Gruhn B, Duarte X, Gameiro P, Lippert E, Bidet S, Cayuela JM, Clappier E, Alonso CN, Zwaan CM, van den Heuvel-Eibrink MM, Izraeli S, Trakhtenbrot L, Archer P, Hancock J, Möricke A, Alten J, Schrappe M, Stanulla M, Strehl S, Attarbaschi A, Dworzak M, Haas OA, Panzer-Grümayer R, Sedék L, Szczepański T, Caye S, Suarez L, Cavé H, Marschalek R

Abstract
Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here, we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and 11 novel TPGs were identified. Thus, a total of 135 different MLL rearrangements habe been identified so far, of which 94 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. Thirty-five out of these 94 TPGs occur recurrently, but only 9 specific gene fusions account for more than 90% of all illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene. We observed an age-dependent breakpoint shift with breakpoints localizing within MLL intron 11 associated with ALL and younger patients, while breakpoints in MLL intron 9 predominate in AML or older patients. The molecular characterisation of MLL breakpoints suggests different etiologies in the different age groups and allows the correlation of functional domains of the MLL gene with clinical outcome. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the MLL recombinome in acute leukemia and demonstrates that the establishment of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease (MRD) analyses for all patients.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 13 July 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.213.

PMID: 28701730 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Rare and low-frequency coding variants alter human adult height.

Pe, 14/07/2017 - 22:25
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Rare and low-frequency coding variants alter human adult height.

Nature. 2017 02 09;542(7640):186-190

Authors: Marouli E, Graff M, Medina-Gomez C, Lo KS, Wood AR, Kjaer TR, Fine RS, Lu Y, Schurmann C, Highland HM, Rüeger S, Thorleifsson G, Justice AE, Lamparter D, Stirrups KE, Turcot V, Young KL, Winkler TW, Esko T, Karaderi T, Locke AE, Masca NG, Ng MC, Mudgal P, Rivas MA, Vedantam S, Mahajan A, Guo X, Abecasis G, Aben KK, Adair LS, Alam DS, Albrecht E, Allin KH, Allison M, Amouyel P, Appel EV, Arveiler D, Asselbergs FW, Auer PL, Balkau B, Banas B, Bang LE, Benn M, Bergmann S, Bielak LF, Blüher M, Boeing H, Boerwinkle E, Böger CA, Bonnycastle LL, Bork-Jensen J, Bots ML, Bottinger EP, Bowden DW, Brandslund I, Breen G, Brilliant MH, Broer L, Burt AA, Butterworth AS, Carey DJ, Caulfield MJ, Chambers JC, Chasman DI, Chen YI, Chowdhury R, Christensen C, Chu AY, Cocca M, Collins FS, Cook JP, Corley J, Galbany JC, Cox AJ, Cuellar-Partida G, Danesh J, Davies G, de Bakker PI, de Borst GJ, de Denus S, de Groot MC, de Mutsert R, Deary IJ, Dedoussis G, Demerath EW, den Hollander AI, Dennis JG, Di Angelantonio E, Drenos F, Du M, Dunning AM, Easton DF, Ebeling T, Edwards TL, Ellinor PT, Elliott P, Evangelou E, Farmaki AE, Faul JD, Feitosa MF, Feng S, Ferrannini E, Ferrario MM, Ferrieres J, Florez JC, Ford I, Fornage M, Franks PW, Frikke-Schmidt R, Galesloot TE, Gan W, Gandin I, Gasparini P, Giedraitis V, Giri A, Girotto G, Gordon SD, Gordon-Larsen P, Gorski M, Grarup N, Grove ML, Gudnason V, Gustafsson S, Hansen T, Harris KM, Harris TB, Hattersley AT, Hayward C, He L, Heid IM, Heikkilä K, Helgeland Ø, Hernesniemi J, Hewitt AW, Hocking LJ, Hollensted M, Holmen OL, Hovingh GK, Howson JM, Hoyng CB, Huang PL, Hveem K, Ikram MA, Ingelsson E, Jackson AU, Jansson JH, Jarvik GP, Jensen GB, Jhun MA, Jia Y, Jiang X, Johansson S, Jørgensen ME, Jørgensen T, Jousilahti P, Jukema JW, Kahali B, Kahn RS, Kähönen M, Kamstrup PR, Kanoni S, Kaprio J, Karaleftheri M, Kardia SL, Karpe F, Kee F, Keeman R, Kiemeney LA, Kitajima H, Kluivers KB, Kocher T, Komulainen P, Kontto J, Kooner JS, Kooperberg C, Kovacs P, Kriebel J, Kuivaniemi H, Küry S, Kuusisto J, La Bianca M, Laakso M, Lakka TA, Lange EM, Lange LA, Langefeld CD, Langenberg C, Larson EB, Lee IT, Lehtimäki T, Lewis CE, Li H, Li J, Li-Gao R, Lin H, Lin LA, Lin X, Lind L, Lindström J, Linneberg A, Liu Y, Liu Y, Lophatananon A, Luan J, Lubitz SA, Lyytikäinen LP, Mackey DA, Madden PA, Manning AK, Männistö S, Marenne G, Marten J, Martin NG, Mazul AL, Meidtner K, Metspalu A, Mitchell P, Mohlke KL, Mook-Kanamori DO, Morgan A, Morris AD, Morris AP, Müller-Nurasyid M, Munroe PB, Nalls MA, Nauck M, Nelson CP, Neville M, Nielsen SF, Nikus K, Njølstad PR, Nordestgaard BG, Ntalla I, O'Connel JR, Oksa H, Loohuis LM, Ophoff RA, Owen KR, Packard CJ, Padmanabhan S, Palmer CN, Pasterkamp G, Patel AP, Pattie A, Pedersen O, Peissig PL, Peloso GM, Pennell CE, Perola M, Perry JA, Perry JR, Person TN, Pirie A, Polasek O, Posthuma D, Raitakari OT, Rasheed A, Rauramaa R, Reilly DF, Reiner AP, Renström F, Ridker PM, Rioux JD, Robertson N, Robino A, Rolandsson O, Rudan I, Ruth KS, Saleheen D, Salomaa V, Samani NJ, Sandow K, Sapkota Y, Sattar N, Schmidt MK, Schreiner PJ, Schulze MB, Scott RA, Segura-Lepe MP, Shah S, Sim X, Sivapalaratnam S, Small KS, Smith AV, Smith JA, Southam L, Spector TD, Speliotes EK, Starr JM, Steinthorsdottir V, Stringham HM, Stumvoll M, Surendran P, 't Hart LM, Tansey KE, Tardif JC, Taylor KD, Teumer A, Thompson DJ, Thorsteinsdottir U, Thuesen BH, Tönjes A, Tromp G, Trompet S, Tsafantakis E, Tuomilehto J, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Tyrer JP, Uher R, Uitterlinden AG, Ulivi S, van der Laan SW, Van Der Leij AR, van Duijn CM, van Schoor NM, van Setten J, Varbo A, Varga TV, Varma R, Edwards DR, Vermeulen SH, Vestergaard H, Vitart V, Vogt TF, Vozzi D, Walker M, Wang F, Wang CA, Wang S, Wang Y, Wareham NJ, Warren HR, Wessel J, Willems SM, Wilson JG, Witte DR, Woods MO, Wu Y, Yaghootkar H, Yao J, Yao P, Yerges-Armstrong LM, Young R, Zeggini E, Zhan X, Zhang W, Zhao JH, Zhao W, Zhao W, Zheng H, Zhou W, EPIC-InterAct Consortium, CHD Exome+ Consortium, ExomeBP Consortium, T2D-Genes Consortium, GoT2D Genes Consortium, Global Lipids Genetics Consortium, ReproGen Consortium, MAGIC Investigators, Rotter JI, Boehnke M, Kathiresan S, McCarthy MI, Willer CJ, Stefansson K, Borecki IB, Liu DJ, North KE, Heard-Costa NL, Pers TH, Lindgren CM, Oxvig C, Kutalik Z, Rivadeneira F, Loos RJ, Frayling TM, Hirschhorn JN, Deloukas P, Lettre G

Abstract
Height is a highly heritable, classic polygenic trait with approximately 700 common associated variants identified through genome-wide association studies so far. Here, we report 83 height-associated coding variants with lower minor-allele frequencies (in the range of 0.1-4.8%) and effects of up to 2 centimetres per allele (such as those in IHH, STC2, AR and CRISPLD2), greater than ten times the average effect of common variants. In functional follow-up studies, rare height-increasing alleles of STC2 (giving an increase of 1-2 centimetres per allele) compromised proteolytic inhibition of PAPP-A and increased cleavage of IGFBP-4 in vitro, resulting in higher bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors. These 83 height-associated variants overlap genes that are mutated in monogenic growth disorders and highlight new biological candidates (such as ADAMTS3, IL11RA and NOX4) and pathways (such as proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan synthesis) involved in growth. Our results demonstrate that sufficiently large sample sizes can uncover rare and low-frequency variants of moderate-to-large effect associated with polygenic human phenotypes, and that these variants implicate relevant genes and pathways.

PMID: 28146470 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Developing the First Recombinant Factor XIII for Congenital Factor XIII Deficiency: Clinical Challenges and Successes.

Pe, 14/07/2017 - 22:25
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Developing the First Recombinant Factor XIII for Congenital Factor XIII Deficiency: Clinical Challenges and Successes.

Semin Thromb Hemost. 2017 Feb;43(1):59-68

Authors: Carcao M, Fukutake K, Inbal A, Kerlin B, Lassila R, Oldenburg J, Garly ML, Nugent D

Abstract
Congenital factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is a rare, autosomal recessive bleeding disorder with potentially life-threatening consequences. FXIII is composed of two subunits (A and B), and a deficiency or dysfunction of either can result in FXIII deficiency. Traditionally, FXIII deficiency has been managed by infusing plasma-derived products containing FXIII (fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and plasma-derived FXIII concentrates), all of which contain both subunits. Despite the increased safety of plasma-derived products, concern remains regarding potential viral safety issues. This review describes the development, from concept to clinical use, of a recombinant FXIII molecule (containing subunit A only; rFXIII-A2) for congenital FXIII-A subunit deficiency. Unmet needs and ongoing challenges in congenital FXIII deficiency are also discussed. Despite the challenges in developing a product for a very rare bleeding disorder, the information gathered on efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of FXIII replacement therapy represents the largest dataset on congenital FXIII-A subunit deficiency in the world. It also provides evidence for the safety and efficacy of monthly prophylaxis with 35 IU/kg of rFXIII-A2 in patients with FXIII-A subunit deficiency. The issues encountered and overcome, along with lessons learned, may be applied to and encourage the development of new recombinant products for other rare bleeding disorders.

PMID: 27556350 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Molecularly Defined Adult Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Ovary: The Clinical Phenotype.

Pe, 14/07/2017 - 22:25
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Molecularly Defined Adult Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Ovary: The Clinical Phenotype.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2016 Nov;108(11):

Authors: McConechy MK, Färkkilä A, Horlings HM, Talhouk A, Unkila-Kallio L, van Meurs HS, Yang W, Rozenberg N, Andersson N, Zaby K, Bryk S, Bützow R, Halfwerk JB, Hooijer GK, van de Vijver MJ, Buist MR, Kenter GG, Brucker SY, Krämer B, Staebler A, Bleeker MC, Heikinheimo M, Kommoss S, Blake Gilks C, Anttonen M, Huntsman DG

Abstract
The histopathologic features of adult granulosa cell tumors (AGCTs) are relatively nonspecific, resulting in misdiagnosis of other cancers as AGCT, a problem that has not been well characterized. FOXL2 mutation testing was used to stratify 336 AGCTs from three European centers into three categories: 1) FOXL2 mutant molecularly defined AGCT (MD-AGCT) (n = 256 of 336), 2) FOXL2 wild-type AGCT (n = 17 of 336), 3) misdiagnosed other tumor types (n = 63 of 336). All statistical tests were two-sided. The overall and disease-specific survival of the misdiagnosed cases was lower than in the MD-AGCTs (P < .001). The misdiagnosed cases accounted for 71.9% of disease-specific deaths within five years. In the population-based cohort, overall survival of MD-AGCT patients was not different from age-matched, population-based controls. Even though 35.2% of all the MD-AGCT patients in our study experienced a relapse, AGCT is usually an indolent disease. The historical, premolecular data underpinning our clinical understanding of AGCT was likely skewed by inclusion of misdiagnosed cases, and future management strategies should reflect the potential for surgical cure and long survival even after relapse.

PMID: 27297428 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

Pe, 14/07/2017 - 22:25
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RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0153788

Authors: Pelttari LM, Khan S, Vuorela M, Kiiski JI, Vilske S, Nevanlinna V, Ranta S, Schleutker J, Winqvist R, Kallioniemi A, Dörk T, Bogdanova NV, Figueroa J, Pharoah PD, Schmidt MK, Dunning AM, García-Closas M, Bolla MK, Dennis J, Michailidou K, Wang Q, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Rosenberg EH, Fasching PA, Beckmann MW, Peto J, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Sawyer EJ, Tomlinson I, Burwinkel B, Surowy H, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Nordestgaard BG, Benitez J, González-Neira A, Neuhausen SL, Anton-Culver H, Brenner H, Arndt V, Meindl A, Schmutzler RK, Brauch H, Brüning T, Lindblom A, Margolin S, Mannermaa A, Hartikainen JM, Chenevix-Trench G, kConFab/AOCS Investigators, Van Dyck L, Janssen H, Chang-Claude J, Rudolph A, Radice P, Peterlongo P, Hallberg E, Olson JE, Giles GG, Milne RL, Haiman CA, Schumacher F, Simard J, Dumont M, Kristensen V, Borresen-Dale AL, Zheng W, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Grip M, Andrulis IL, Glendon G, Devilee P, Seynaeve C, Hooning MJ, Collée M, Cox A, Cross SS, Shah M, Luben RN, Hamann U, Torres D, Jakubowska A, Lubinski J, Couch FJ, Yannoukakos D, Orr N, Swerdlow A, Darabi H, Li J, Czene K, Hall P, Easton DF, Mattson J, Blomqvist C, Aittomäki K, Nevanlinna H

Abstract
Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.

PMID: 27149063 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Intracranial haemorrhage in children and adolescents with severe haemophilia A or B - the impact of prophylactic treatment.

To, 13/07/2017 - 22:24
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Intracranial haemorrhage in children and adolescents with severe haemophilia A or B - the impact of prophylactic treatment.

Br J Haematol. 2017 Jul 12;:

Authors: Andersson NG, Auerswald G, Barnes C, Carcao M, Dunn AL, Fijnvandraat K, Hoffmann M, Kavakli K, Kenet G, Kobelt R, Kurnik K, Liesner R, Mäkipernaa A, Manco-Johnson MJ, Mancuso ME, Molinari AC, Nolan B, Perez Garrido R, Petrini P, Platokouki HE, Shapiro AD, Wu R, Ljung R

Abstract
The discussion of prophylactic therapy in haemophilia is largely focused on joint outcomes. The impact of prophylactic therapy on intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is less known. This study aimed to analyse ICH in children with haemophilia, with a focus on different prophylaxis regimens and sequelae of ICH. We conducted a multicentre retrospective and prospective study that included 33 haemophilia centres from 20 countries. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents born between 1993 and 2014, with severe haemophilia A or B without inhibitors. Participants were categorized by prophylaxis regimen: full, partial or none, based on dose and dose frequency of regular infusions. The cohort study included 1515 children: 29 cases of ICH over 8038 patient years were reported. The incidence of ICH in the prophylaxis group, 0·00033 cases of ICH/patient year, was significantly lower compared to the no prophylaxis group, 0·017 cases of ICH/patient year (RR 50·06; P < 0·001) and the partial prophylaxis group, 0·0050 cases of ICH/patient year (RR 14·92; P = 0·007). In the on-demand-group, 8% (2/24) children with ICH died and 33% had long-term sequelae, including intellectual and behavioural problems, paresis and epilepsy. Children on regular, frequent prophylaxis have a low risk of ICH compared to those using non-frequent or no prophylaxis.

PMID: 28699675 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Baseline Characteristics Predicting Very Good Outcome of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Young Patients With High Cytogenetic Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia - A Retrospective Analysis From the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of...

Ke, 12/07/2017 - 22:24
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Baseline Characteristics Predicting Very Good Outcome of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Young Patients With High Cytogenetic Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia - A Retrospective Analysis From the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the EBMT.

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk. 2017 Jun 17;:

Authors: van Gelder M, Ziagkos D, de Wreede L, van Biezen A, Dreger P, Gramatzki M, Stelljes M, Andersen NS, Schaap N, Vitek A, Beelen D, Lindström V, Finke J, Passweg J, Eder M, Machaczka M, Delgado J, Krüger W, Raida L, Socié G, Jindra P, Afanasyev B, Wagner E, Chalandon Y, Henseler A, Schoenland S, Kröger N, Schetelig J, CLL Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with genetically high-risk relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia have shorter median progression-free survival (PFS) with kinase- and BCL2-inhibitors (KI, BCL2i). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) may result in sustained PFS, especially in younger patients because of its age-dependent non-relapse mortality (NRM) risk, but outcome data are lacking for this population.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Risk factors for 2-year NRM and 8-year PFS were identified in patients < 50 years in an updated European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry cohort (n = 197; median follow-up, 90.4 months) by Cox regression modeling, and predicted probabilities of NRM and PFS of 2 reference patients with favorable or unfavorable characteristics were plotted.
RESULTS: Predictors for poor 8-year PFS were no remission at the time of alloHCT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.5) and partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donor (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.2). The latter variable also predicted a higher risk of 2-year NRM (HR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.4-11.6) compared with HLA-matched sibling donors. Predicted 2-year NRM and 8-year PFS of a high cytogenetic risk (del(17p) and/or del(11q)) patient in remission with a matched related donor were 12% (95% CI, 3%-22%) and 54% (95% CI, 38%-69%), and for an unresponsive patient with a female partially HLA-matched unrelated donor 37% (95% CI, 12%-62%) and 38% (95% CI, 13%-63%).
CONCLUSION: Low predicted NRM and high 8-year PFS in favorable transplant high cytogenetic risk patients compares favorably with outcomes with KI or BCL2i. Taking into account the amount of uncertainty for predicting survival after alloHCT and after sequential administration of KI and BCL2i, alloHCT remains a valid option for younger patients with high cytogenetic risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia with a well-HLA-matched donor.

PMID: 28694085 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Bloodstream infections in acute myeloid leukemia patients treated according to the Finnish Leukemia Group AML-2003 protocol - a prospective nationwide study.

La, 08/07/2017 - 22:20
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Bloodstream infections in acute myeloid leukemia patients treated according to the Finnish Leukemia Group AML-2003 protocol - a prospective nationwide study.

Infect Dis (Lond). 2017 Jul 06;:1-10

Authors: Kolonen A, Sinisalo M, Huttunen R, Syrjänen J, Aittoniemi J, Huhtala H, Sankelo M, Rintala H, Räty R, Jantunen E, Nousiainen T, Säily M, Kauppila M, Itälä-Remes M, Ollikainen H, Rauhala A, Koistinen P, Elonen E, Finnish Leukemia Group

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Infections greatly influence the outcome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients receiving intensive treatment. The aim of this study was to establish the incidence, microbial etiology, risk factors and prognosis of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with AML and compare the results with the previous treatment protocol (AML-92).
METHODS: Registery data were gathered prospectively from 357 patients aged 16-65 years recruited on the AML-2003 treatment protocol between November 2003 and November 2011 during different treatment cycles.
RESULTS: Blood culture data were available on 977 treatment episodes, in which there were 503 BSIs (51%). The overall incidence rate (IR) for BSIs (per 1000 hospital days) was 16.7. Twenty patients (5.6%) died due to an infection and 16 of them (80%) had a BSI. The most commonly detected microbes (polymicrobial episodes included) in blood cultures were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS, 24.7%), viridans group streptococci (VGS, 19.1%), enterococci (13.9%) and Enterobacteriacae group (25.9%). The etiology of BSIs varied greatly from treatment cycle to cycle.
CONCLUSIONS: Enterococcal BSIs have increased compared to our previous treatment protocol, and they represent significant pathogens in blood cultures. Infection-related mortality has decreased despite the increase in the IR of BSIs. Enterococci seem to be an increasingly prominent pathogen underlying BSIs in the AML patients, especially during induction therapy (20%).

PMID: 28683646 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Growth impairment and gonadal axis abnormalities are common in survivors of paediatric brain tumours.

Pe, 07/07/2017 - 22:20
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Growth impairment and gonadal axis abnormalities are common in survivors of paediatric brain tumours.

Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul 06;:

Authors: Pietilä S, Mäkipernaa A, Koivisto AM, Lenko HL

Abstract
AIM: Childhood brain tumour survivors have a high risk of endocrine morbidity. This study evaluated the growth, pubertal development and gonadal function in survivors of childhood brain tumours and identified factors associated with the problems we observed.
METHODS: The 52 subjects (52% male) were diagnosed in 1983-1997 and treated for brain tumours at Tampere University Hospital, Finland. They were followed up at a mean age of 14.2 (3.8-28.7) years, a mean of 7.5 (1.5-15.1) years after diagnosis.
RESULTS: We found that 30 (58%) participants had a lower height standard deviation score at follow up than at diagnosis and short stature at follow up was associated with tumour malignancy (p=0.005), radiotherapy (p=0.004), chemotherapy (p=0.024), growth hormone deficiency (p<0.001), hypogonadism (p=0.044) and delayed puberty (p=0.021). We found that five needed sex hormones to induce puberty, one had precocious puberty, 12 (23%) had growth hormone deficiency and eight (22%) of the 36 pubertal or post-pubertal patients had hypogonadism. Testicular volume was low in 83% of late or post-pubertal male survivors.
CONCLUSION: Growth impairment, growth hormone deficiency and hypogonadism were common in childhood brain tumour survivors and low testicular volume was also common in male survivors. Lifelong annual follow-up checks are indicated for survivors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 28683157 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Natural IgM antibodies in the immune defence against neoehrlichiosis.

Pe, 07/07/2017 - 22:20
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Natural IgM antibodies in the immune defence against neoehrlichiosis.

Infect Dis (Lond). 2017 Jul 06;:1-8

Authors: Wennerås C, Goldblatt D, Zancolli M, Mattsson M, Wass L, Hörkkö S, Rosén A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Neoehrlichiosis is an infectious disease caused by the tick-borne bacterium "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis". Splenectomy and rituximab therapies are risk factors for severe neoehrlichiosis. Our aim was to examine if neoehrlichiosis patients had low levels of natural IgM antibodies and/or were hypogammaglobulinemic, and if such deficiencies were associated with asplenia and vascular complications.
METHODS: Neoehrlichiosis patients (n = 9) and control subjects (n = 10) were investigated for serum levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM, and for levels of natural IgM antibodies to pneumococcal polysaccharides (6B, 14), and to the malondialdehyde acetaldehyde epitope of oxidized LDL. The multivariate method Projection to Latent Structures was used to analyze the data.
RESULTS: The levels of natural IgM antibodies of various specificities were decreased or not measurable in half of the studied patients with neoehrlichiosis. Only one patient and one control subject were hypogammaglobulinemic. An inverse relationship was noted between the levels of natural IgM antibodies and the development of deep vein thrombosis. Unexpectedly, no association was seen between having or not having a spleen and the levels of natural IgM antibody levels in the circulation.
CONCLUSIONS: Neither hypogammaglobulinemia nor lack of natural IgM antibodies alone predisposes for severe neoehrlichiosis. The importance of the spleen in the immune defence against Ca. N. mikurensis probably lies in its capacity to generate or maintain specific antibodies.

PMID: 28682152 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Impact of lenalidomide-based induction therapy on the mobilization of CD34(+) cells, blood graft cellular composition, and post-transplant recovery in myeloma patients: a prospective multicenter study.

Pe, 07/07/2017 - 22:20
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Impact of lenalidomide-based induction therapy on the mobilization of CD34(+) cells, blood graft cellular composition, and post-transplant recovery in myeloma patients: a prospective multicenter study.

Transfusion. 2017 Jul 05;:

Authors: Partanen A, Valtola J, Silvennoinen R, Ropponen A, Siitonen T, Putkonen M, Sankelo M, Pelkonen J, Mäntymaa P, Varmavuo V, Jantunen E

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug that is also currently used in transplant-eligible patients with multiple myeloma. Previous studies have suggested a negative impact of lenalidomide on the mobilization of CD34(+) cells. No data are available regarding the more detailed composition of blood grafts after lenalidomide.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In a multicenter, prospective study, we analyzed the mobilization of CD34(+) cells, graft cellular composition, and post-transplant hematologic recovery in 26 patients with multiple myeloma after lenalidomide-based induction and in 34 lenalidomide-naive controls with multiple myeloma. All patients were mobilized with low-dose cyclophosphamide plus granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor. The cellular composition of the grafts was analyzed from thawed, cryopreserved samples with flow cytometry. Graft function was evaluated by engraftment data and by complete blood counts until 12 months after the graft infusion.
RESULTS: Patients in the lenalidomide arm had lower median peak CD34(+) counts and approximately 40% lower CD34(+) cell yields from the first apheresis session, but these differences were not significant. The median total number of CD34(+) cells collected was comparable (6.4 vs. 7.5 × 10(6) /kg). The number of apheresis sessions was higher in the lenalidomide group (2 vs. 1; p = 0.039). The blood graft composition was comparable between the groups. Hematologic recovery within 12 months post-transplant did not differ between the groups.
CONCLUSION: Lenalidomide-based induction seems to have an impact on the number of aphereses performed, but not on the total yields of the CD34(+) cells in the graft. Neither cellular composition of the grafts nor post-transplant recovery was affected by the limited pre-transplant exposure to lenalidomide.

PMID: 28681435 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants: Results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

Ti, 04/07/2017 - 22:18

Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants: Results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

Int J Cancer. 2017 Jul 03;:

Authors: Barrdahl M, Rudolph A, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Broeks A, Fasching PA, Beckmann MW, Gago-Dominguez M, Castelao JE, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Gapstur SM, Gaudet MM, Brenner H, Arndt V, Brauch H, Hamann U, Mannermaa A, Lambrechts D, Jongen L, Flesch-Janys D, Thoene K, Couch FJ, Giles GG, Simard J, Goldberg MS, Figueroa J, Michailidou K, Bolla MK, Dennis J, Wang Q, Eilber U, Behrens S, Czene K, Hall P, Cox A, Cross S, Swerdlow A, Schoemaker MJ, Dunning AM, Kaaks R, Pharoah PDP, Schmidt M, Garcia-Closas M, Easton DF, Milne RL, Chang-Claude J

Abstract
Investigating the most likely causal variants identified by fine-mapping analyses may improve the power to detect gene-environment interactions. We assessed the interplay between 70 SNPs identified by genetic fine-scale mapping of susceptibility loci and 11 epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases, 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-) disease. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability (BFDP) was computed to assess the noteworthiness of the results. Four potential gene-environment interactions were identified as noteworthy (BFDP<0.80) when assuming a true prior interaction probability of 0.01. The strongest interaction result in relation to overall breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR-rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint =0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, Pint =1.8 × 10(-4) ). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14-rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, Pint =1.9 × 10(-5) ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint =1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, Pint =1.8 × 10(-4) ) and between 8q23-rs13267382 and age at first full-term pregnancy (ORint =0.89, 95% CI: 0.83-0.95, Pint =5.2 × 10(-4) ). While these results do not suggest any strong gene-environment interactions, our results may still be useful to inform experimental studies. These may in turn, shed light on the potential interactions observed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 28670784 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]